University of Louisville’s College of Arts and Sciences sponsors the event through its Saturday Academy community outreach program on black history, culture and current issues. The summit will be at Hotel Louisville, 120 W. Broadway. The conference for adult women, with the theme Moving from Pain to Power: (The) Help is on the Way, runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days and includes a 6 p.m.-8 p.m. dinner and lecture March 23.

The March 23 dinner speaker will be former Washington Post columnist Donna Britt, who also will sign copies of her book “Brothers (& Me): A Memoir of Loving and Giving.” Her topic is Loving and Giving: Do We Do Them Too Much? The evening event is open to men and women and is $30 for those not registered for the summit.

Presenters will include New York City veterinarian and Haitian relief activist Masani Accime; New York City-based Resilience Advocacy Project director Brooke Richie-Babbage; Washington, D.C.-based holistic physician Tracy Freeman; Chicago information technology manager Joyce Lewis; and University of Georgia gerontology institute director and health policy expert Toni Miles.

Kentucky presenters will be UofL faculty members Tomarra Adams, Lundeana Thomas and Nefertiti Burton; Kentucky Commission on Women director Eleanor Jordan; Metro Louisville chief of community building Sadiqa Reynolds: writer-television commentator Betty Baye; artist Elmer Lucille Allen; teacher-activist Aletha Fields; and entrepreneur Cheketa Tinsley, among many others. UofL’s African American Theater Program and Heaven and Earth 360 also will perform.

Summit registration of $60, or $50 for seniors and students, includes all sessions, meals and conference resources. To register by the March 17 deadline, contact LyShanna Cunningham by email or at 502-852-2658; there will be no onsite registration.

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Judy Hughes
Judy Hughes is a communications and marketing specialist for UofL’s Office of Communications and Marketing, where she works in media relations and contributes to news about the university’s College of Arts and Sciences and Kent School of Social Work. She previously worked in news as a writer and editor for a daily newspaper and The Associated Press.