Arts, humanities, sciences professors share history’s impact on today

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               LOUISVILLE, Ky. — University of Louisville professors lecturing in a public, monthly series this semester will examine how history affects the present in their wide-ranging fields of theater, art, political science and humanities.

               The College of Arts and Sciences and the Liberal Studies Project offer the Meet the Professor series to highlight the college’s research and cultural offerings.

                The Thursday luncheon talks begin at noon in the University Club. Reservations are required, with $15 payment by check. To reserve a spot, contact Janna Tajibaeva at 502-852-2247 or janna@louisville.edu no later than the Monday before each event.

                Here are the spring 2019 semester talks:

                Jan. 10 – “Reading Kanafani in Kentucky: A Dramatic Journey in Five Acts,” Russell Vandenbroucke, theater arts professor and director of the Peace, Justice and Conflict Transformation program. He will link Greek tragedy to a current project of directing a stage adaptation of Palestinian activist Ghassan Kanafani’s novella “Returning to Haifa.” The Kanafani project affirms theater that engages society rather than providing escape from it.

                Feb. 7 – “Talking to ‘Others’: The Medieval Roots of Civilized Discourse,” Pam Beattie, comparative humanities professor. She will explore the tension between peaceful and violent approaches to the religious “others” of the Middle Ages by focusing on medieval images and texts that show both.

                March 7– “Judges Who Look like America: President Obama’s Appointments to the Federal Judiciary,” Laura Moyer, political science professor. She will talk about how nearly three-fourths of Obama’s U.S. Courts of Appeals nominees were women and/or racial and ethnic minorities, how this is reflected in some court decisions and what that may mean for President Donald Trump’s judicial legacy.

                April 4 – “Low Resolution: Making Paintings in an Expanded Field,” Tiffany Calvert, fine arts professor. She will discuss her artwork related to fragmenting and obstructing images, as well as how modern painting’s legacy of perplexing images, even back to impressionism, dovetails with changing visual information in contemporary, everyday life.

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    Judy Hughes
    Judy Hughes is a communications and marketing specialist for UofL’s Office of Communications and Marketing, where she works in media relations and contributes to news about the university’s College of Arts and Sciences and Kent School of Social Work. She previously worked in news as a writer and editor for a daily newspaper and The Associated Press.